Esoteric London

No. 669: Waterloo Place, SW1

Posted in Statues by esotericlondon on September 20, 2012

Waterloo Place, London, SW1. Photo © Roger Dean 2012

How the Poor Live – George R. Sims, 1883:

If I were asked to say off-hand what was the greatest curse of the poor and what was the greatest blessing, I think my answer to the first query would be the public house, and to the second the hospital. Of course, I might be wrong. There are some people who will contend that in these islands the greatest blessing of the natives of all degrees is that they are Great Britons. Our patriotic songs bid us all rejoice greatly at the fact, and patriotism is not a class privilege. The starved outcast, crouching for shelter on a wild March night in one of the stone recesses of London Bridge, has a right to exclaim with the same pride as the Marquis of Westminster -

‘Far as the breeze can bear the billows’ foam,
Survey our empire and behold our home.’

His soul, for all we know, may rejoice greatly that Britannia rules the waves [...].

[ Britannia in the photograph above sits on a lion at the base of the statue of Colin Campbell, Field Marshal Lord Clyde, in Waterloo Place, just off Pall Mall in SW1. R.D.]

2 Responses

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  1. laura@eljaygee said, on September 20, 2012 at 9:09 am

    Your commentary is as unique as the angles and places you photograph. The greatest curse to the poor is cheap supermarket beer and the sale of public houses to make homes for wealthier folk.


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